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Lawn Grasses are Good for the Environment

Lawn Grasses are Good for the Environment

Posted by Lisa Taylor on 13th Nov 2018

When we think about the environment and how plants are beneficial to the earth’s atmosphere we tend to think about rainforests and the exchange of gases occurring with trees. Did you know that grasses also play a substantial part in this gas exchange too? An area of around 500 square metres produces as much oxygen as two trees at 100 foot high! And it doesn’t take as long to grow 500 square metres of grass as it does for a tree to grow to 100 foot. An area of approximately 70 square metres can provide the amount of oxygen required by an average human in a day. That’s not all – part of this gas exchange is the absorption of carbon dioxide – lawn grasses absorb an unexpectedly high volume of carbon dioxide daily!

Grass also plays a massive part in nature’s water filtration system. The blades trap pollution and gases in the blades, as well as enormous quantities of dust. These are all filtered through the grass. This natural act of self-cleaning is due to the addition of mycelium, a type of fungus. Mycelium helps to absorb dead cells and nutrients and can sometimes be seen on the end of grass as little white threads. This is a sign of healthy grass, and it is essential to stop a thick layer of dead thatch forming.

As turf growers we cut turf from our own fields to provide grass for commercial and residential lawn areas. Once we have used up all of the turf in one of our fields we plough and rotovate the ground before planting new seed and growing a brand new field of turf. We keep this cycle going – growing and supplying turf for use elsewhere. As a result of this many householders and public grass areas alike benefit from a lovely green grass lawn.

So, you could say that we are playing apart in helping our environment too!